Polling styles show difference between Coakley and Brown

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I don’t know if you’ve been following Massachusetts politics, but there is a run-off election for the deceased senator Edward (Ted) Kennedy between Martha Coakley and Scott Brown.  I’ve been telephoned twice, once by each candidate’s supporters.  I think the difference in how these polls were conducted tell you a lot about the candidates.

Scott Brown’s poll:

It was automated and voice-recognition driven.   A long series of questions were asked before the final “Who will you vote for?” question.  Questions like “Does abortion affect who you will vote for?”, “Do you support a health bill that will add trillions in debt to our country?” “Do you believe in fiscal responsibility for our govt?”.  Very slick…

Marth Coakley’s call:

It was a person who first states “I’m from the Martha Coakley campaign”.  She asked if I knew there was an election on Tuesday and if I was going to vote.  She asked if I knew where the poll was.  She asked if any voting members of my family needed a ride to the poll and gave me a number to call if I didn’t have a ride.  That was it.  There was no “Who will you vote for?”  Nothing else.

If you’re a MA resident, I hope you vote on Tuesday.  Its a pretty important election no matter what side of the fence you sit on.

Announcing a new distributed computing paradigm: ULSER

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I’m pleased to announce a new distributed effort named ULSER.  ULSER stands for a set of uncompromisable architectural principles, specifically:

  • Uniform constrained interface.
  • Links as the engine of application state
  • Statelessness for scalability
  • Enterprise applicable
  • Resource and representation oriented

Why call it ULSER?  Well, even though these architectural principles are extremely useful to design distributed applications (and middleware), I’ve found that discussing any of these  principles publicly have given me (and others) an ulcer.   So, I thought I’d make these principles my own and let others share the pain.  I’m also going to create a set of standards called ULSER-*.  ULSER-*.org will focus on bringing ULSER principles to middleware technology.  Since middleware generally produces ulcers in engineers I think the name is perfect!  I’ve also created an open source Java project called EasyULSER so that you can let Java give you an ulcer too!

Also, don’t worry, I’ve deliberated with the doctor who discovered ulcers and coined the term “ulcer”.  He didn’t mind me using the term as long as what I’m doing will cause me an ulcer.  The ulcer community didn’t seem to mind either as when I tried to explain to them the principles of ULSER and how I’m using them, it gave them an ulcer too, so they were happy.  So, it looks like we’re ready to go!  ONWARD!

RESTEasy 1.2.RC1 Released

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We’re getting ready to release 1.2.GA.  This is a release candidate that fixes a bunch of outstanding bugs and reorganizes the project a little bit as well.  It is strongly suggested you take a look at the migration guide because a few pieces of RESTEasy have been refactored into separate Maven modules.

All links to documentation and downloads are available at the RESTEasy Project Website.

The Dali Lama is a Pats fan

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Saw this in the Boston Globe today.  The Dali Lama is a pats fan!

patslama

RESTEasy in eWeek

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Darryl Taft did a nice piece on RESTEasy.  Thanks Darryl!  It is always cool when eWeek finds the stuff we’re doing at JBoss news worthy :).

I need a new name for this blog

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I enjoyed being “Angry Bill” for awhile, but I think it has run its course.  Really, its not because any grief I’ve got at Red Hat or within the Java community.  It all has to do with my family.  I actually get a lot of crap for “Angry Bill”.  My wife uses it to ridicule me.  My paranoid mother (you know how mothers are) thinks some crazy on the internet is going to take too much offense and seek to do me bodily harm.  When my wife and extended family started calling me “Angry Bill” instead of Bill, I knew it was time to make a change.

So, what to change it too?  Doing a play around Hani‘s nickname for me, Bill Berk, is a thought.  From wikipedia:

  • Berk, slang for an idiot
  • Berk, rhyming slang for Cunt

Idiot and Cunt pretty much sum up my major contributions to the open source Java community.  Yet, a play around Berk is still too much of the same thing as “Angry Bill” was already a metaphor for the same adjectives.  If you knew who The Real Angry Bill was you’d understand that I was making fun of myself by naming my blog “Angry Bill”.  Besides, I’m scared that people will actually start thinking my real name is Bill Berk and not Bill Burke.  Now that would be a catastrophe 😉

I could be really boring and name it “Burke Central, Bill Burke’s tech blog”.  Or maybe “Tech Tailgate”?  “Bill’s Blog” sounds kinda corny, but catchy.  Or how about “Mr. Bill‘s Blog, Oh Nooooo! Mr. Bill talks tech”

I will never complain about my job again!

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My dad sent me this.  I thought it was hilarious.

Worst job ever…

Resteasy JAX-RS Beta 3 Released

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This is the thrid release of JBoss’s JSR-311, JAX-RS, Restful Web Services implementation. Nothing special in this release, just a lot of bug fixes the community found as well as more spec-feature complete. We have some more things coming down the pipe in the next month, so stay tuned!

Links to where to download, post user questions, and our documentation are all available on our WIKI.

Release Notes – Resteasy – Version Beta3

Bug

  • [RESTEASY-25] – mime property types ignored when matching resource methods to requests
  • [RESTEASY-26] – MessageBodyWriter matching should use the entity class, not the method’s reflected return type.
  • [RESTEASY-27] – Resource Locators should be dynamically processed

Task

  • [RESTEASY-6] – Implement all methods with decode parameter within UriInfo
  • [RESTEASY-20] – Suport for @Path.limited

Can’t I have an opinion?

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I’m annoyed today. Seems my Go Away Ruby blog has some people thinking that I wrote it to discredit Ruby because I believed RoR is a threat to JBoss. Andy Oliver wrote:

“Ruby was his target, probably because of a perceived (though wrongly so in my opinion) threat to JBoss’s still flagship JBossAS.”

Savio recently linked to my blog in this quote:

“If RoR is such a threat, why are other Java app server vendors “doing okay“?”

Does he think I think RoR is a threat as well? This particular Savio quote was referencing a hilarious quote from a Reuter analyst:

“Chowdhry of Global Equities Research said the prospects for JBoss were dim because its software was designed to work with the Java programming language.

He said Java was losing market share as businesses embrace Ruby, a programming language that is easier to use and works with an open-source rival to JBoss known as Ruby on Rails.”

PHP, Perl, and Python have been around as long or longer than Ruby and RoR, have larger libraries, more applications, and a larger user base. So does that mean an even a closer death for Java and JBoss? Heiko Braun had a funny comment on an internal JBoss mail list:

You see Bill what happens when promoting REST?

Seriously guys, can’t I have an opinion on anything? Maybe its just that I don’t like Ruby or RoR, ya think? It can’t be that simple can it? There has to be some JBoss conspiracy. I just have to be one of Rickard’s evil aliens. Or as Bobby Boucher‘s mother would say, “Bill Burke is the devil.”

House red please

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Recently, my wife and I were invited to a friends wine tasting party. It was fun because they made a game out of it. They had 10 bottles of red, 10 bottles of white covered to hide their identity and numbered. You received a card and had to match the wines listed on the card with the numbered bottle of wine. My wife and I love to go to nice restaurants and had sampled at least one of every type of wine listed on the cards, so we thought we had a really good chance of winning the game. Turns out, we only got one right, and that was to correctly identify the port. 🙂 I was sure I had 16-17 right on the card. So much for being a wine connoisseur. This experience taught me a valuable lesson. When going out to eat now, I’ll only buy the cheapest wine on the list. Kind or year doesn’t matter. I won’t know the difference.

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